healing

Meet The Sponsors: LEAD

03-03-2018-32-Lovestruckportraits.jpg
 
03-03-2018-26-Lovestruckportraits.jpg

The Modern Woman Show & Expo is fast approaching and we want to take a minute to talk about Lead Pilates & Cycle and Integrated Health & Wellness. This amazing local business is a show sponsor, will be showing their studio-to-street fashion on Saturday night’s runway, and hosting not one, but two amazing workshops. 

Lead is Saskatoon’s premiere Integrated Health and Wellness facility. Home to over 80 weekly Pilates-based fitness classes that make you sweat, strong, stretch and move, The clinic offers Chiropractic, Naturopathic Medicine, Massage Therapy, Physiotherapy, Clinical Counselling, Reflexology + BodyTalk and Athletic Therapy.  

 
lead.jpg
 

At 10am on Saturday, April 14 the instructors from Lead are hosting a Pilates-based Bootcamp Fusion class that is sure to get your heart pumping, booty and legs burning, and your abs shaking. This class is perfect for the modern woman looking for a full body burn in just 45 minutes. 

At 10am on Sunday, April 15 Lead’s Founder, Jana Danielson, will be hosting “Love the Life You Lead”, an interactive workshop offering tools to improve your health and address the obstacles that may be holding you back. With a focus of nutrition, hydration, sleep, and movement, join Jana for what’s sure to be an inspiring and informative experience. 

Tickets to both classes are $10 and include the cost of the workshop, general admission to the show, and a swag bag. Who doesn’t love swag?

03-03-2018-16-Lovestruckportraits.jpg
03-03-2018-2-Lovestruckportraits.jpg

Lead’s studio-to-street fashion will be featured on the runway for Saturday night’s fashion show. They will be showcasing spring pieces from their amazing in-house lines such as Alo, Body Language, MPG, and Free Label. You will be able to see these trendy and versatile pieces on the runway, and then shop the looks for yourself at Lead’s booth following the show!

Tickets to this event are $47 and VIP tickets holders have access to the lounge at 5:30pm for cocktails, appies, and music by DJ Kush. These tickets also get holders preferred seating, the chance to win amazing prizes, and an awesome swag bag. The fashion show hosted by CTV’s Chantel Saunders begins at 6:30pm. 

 

Tickets for all three events are available at www.modernwomansaskatoon.com 

 

See you there!

Katie

Xoxo

It's Okay to Be Okay...or not.

The other day a new friend, a fellow Phoenix mama, expressed sympathy for my four recurrent miscarriages. She apologized for the losses and said, “oh, your poor heart.” While I certainly appreciated the love and her sweet, kind heart, I didn't feel the sting of pain. In fact, I felt nothing.  There was no sadness or anger or angst like there had been for years before. Instead, there was just gratitude for her acknowledging my journey and my angel babies. But I spent the next 24 hours examining myself. Was my depression creeping back in? Had I lost all capacity to feel somewhere between the second and third loss? Was I numb? Truth be told, I panicked a bit.

A few days later, I asked another friend for some blog ideas and she suggested this exact topic. She too was a Phoenix mama: she lost her son at 23 weeks. We discussed at length these feelings, or lack thereof, and that it wa scaring me. She reassured me with her own similar feelings and how, with time and grieving and support, we heal and that's okay. But yet, we still feel guilty for it.

It’s as though we think that if we move on and find happiness after the loss (and this can be any loss-not just infant or pregnancy) we are betraying them. We think we aren’t allowed to experience joy again when our world had previously crumbled. We think our happiness isn’t deserved and somehow, the loss needs to stay with us in some negative, cloud-hanging-above-us way that prevents us from forgetting what happened. Because, of course, if we’re happy and moved on, we think we will forget them.

thankfulquote.jpg

Similarly, when we find this strength and resiliency after a loss, we feel guilty for that too. I know I especially do. When I miscarried the third time, I had quite a bit of time alone to cry most of my tears and grieve. Plus I had a few tools under my belt for bereavement so I was able to process more quickly that time. A few days later, I had two friends bring meals for us (at separate times) and they both cried while standing in my living room while I awkwardly consoled them. I understood their pain in knowing their friend was going through a terrible loss but it was weird to be okay when it was happening to me and they weren’t okay. I felt like I was supposed to be hysterical and upset to show others how awful the loss was to us. I felt that if I wasn’t crying and grieving outwardly, the loss didn’t matter to me. I also felt like my strength portrayed me as unfeeling and bitchy. It can be strange to see someone be fine so soon after a loss but we all grieve in different ways and at different stages. It's never linear and it's never the same with each loss. When my friend’s dad died, she was more relieved he wasn’t suffering anymore and her grief didn’t show itself as hysterical tears when she told me his death story. Grief isn’t a one size fits all. And that’s okay.

grief.jpg

I’ve since learned that it’s okay to be okay. I can’t imagine any lost loved ones are looking upon us and wishing us ill will for moving on and finding happiness again. I’d like to believe my angel babies want me to be happy after suffering so many times before. Once in awhile, in a seemingly random and unexpected moment, I'm hit with that wave of sadness again but then I think about where I am in that exact moment and am thankful for the hardships because I am the best version of myself for that time because of what's happened. Moving on doesn’t mean we will forget them, not if we don’t allow it. That’s why many people want their loved ones recognized. When we say their names or send kind messages on anniversaries, we keep their memory alive. When we hang pictures and tell stories and shoot a shot in their honour, we keep them alive in our hearts.

And in our hearts is where it matters most.

I’ve also learned that it’s okay to not be okay. Sometimes grief is so heavy it smothers us. We feel like we can’t breathe and getting through the day seems damn near impossible. I rarely have these days myself now but I know many people that do. Your job as the okay person is to love them through it. Check in daily whether through email or text or a phone call. Bring a meal or a book or a bubble bath kit even if they say they don’t need anything. We always need something in times of grieving but can rarely decipher what it is so opt to saying, “It’s okay, I don’t need anything.” Grieving people don’t want to feel like a burden on others so more often than not, they don’t reach out. Thankfully there are so many online and in-person support groups now that grieving can be felt in a safe, healthy space with people who are also grieving. Many people are not okay, and that’s okay. There is always someone to listen, to cry with, to hug you, to bring you anything. We grieve to process and then heal. We only hope we come out of the other side of it strong and healthy, ready to move on with love and acceptance.

stormquote.jpg

To be okay is okay. To not be okay is also okay. We are all perfect souls in imperfect bodies trying our best to make the most out of this life. Whether you have healed and are okay or haven’t healed yet, there are many people in your corner rooting for you, including the ones you’ve lost. They’re in your heart, you memories, your energy awaiting your triumphant rise a new kind of happiness once again.